Hormona

Weird early pregnancy symptoms

Are you pregnant? Or wondering if you might be pregnant? Are you experiencing symptoms and wondering if they are normal or not? Today we are going to talk about unusual early pregnancy symptoms, what is normal and what you should see a doctor about.

The most reliable way to find out whether you are pregnant is by taking a pregnancy test. Some people know before they take a test though. All women experience pregnancy differently but there are some common, and some less common, symptoms that might suggest you are pregnant.

There are a lot of hormonal changes that happen when you are pregnant. These can cause a huge number of changes in your body that can cause unusual early pregnancy symptoms.

It is important to note that a lot of the symptoms of early pregnancy can be similar to those during your menstrual cycle or just before your period. If you are trying to get pregnant (and having trouble), it might be stressful to monitor these symptoms. Look after yourself and remember that the best way to know if you are pregnant is to take a test.

The most well-known symptoms of early pregnancy include nausea/vomiting (“morning sickness”), tender breasts or a missed period.

 

Unusual early pregnancy symptoms: The checklist

There are also many other symptoms that might not be so well-known. Most of them are caused by the changes in hormones that come with pregnancy.

Mood swings

Our moods are heavily influenced by our hormones. It is not uncommon to feel more emotional than usual during early pregnancy. If you already have trouble with your mood before you were pregnant (e.g. depression or anxiety) it is a good idea to talk to your healthcare professional to make sure you have a plan in place for your pregnancy.

Headaches

Hormonal changes can also lead to headaches. Early pregnancy can also be a stressful time for some people and stress or fatigue can also cause headaches. It is important to check with a doctor or pharmacist before taking medicine for pain while pregnant.

Dizziness

Most people’s blood pressure drops in the first few months of pregnancy. This can cause people to feel lightheaded or dizzy (especially when standing up). If you are feeling dizzy it is important to get up slowly and give your body time to adjust to changes in position.

While dizziness is relatively common in pregnancy, if you faint or pass out then it is important to seek medical attention.

Acne

Acne is often very much influenced by hormones. Some women find that the hormonal changes of pregnancy can cause acne to appear or get worse. Although there are other reasons why you may have adult acne.

Some skincare products (such as retinol) should be avoided during pregnancy. It is important to check that your skincare products or medicines are safe in pregnancy before starting any acne treatment.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists have published some information about skin conditions during pregnancy.

Changes to the sense of smell or taste

Some women find that their sense of smell gets stronger. Sometimes strong smells might make you feel sick. It is also possible to get a strange metallic taste in your mouth. This is also because of the pregnancy hormones.

Fatigue

Fatigue is a common symptom of pregnancy. This is also due to the changes in the hormones in your body.

Shortness of breath

Shortness of breath is a sensation that feels as if it is hard to breathe. Or hard to get enough air into your lungs. This can be a symptom of pregnancy due to hormone changes. It can also be a symptom of something more serious, however. So if you are having trouble breathing, have pain in your chest or are worried that something is wrong then please see a medical professional.

Cravings

Most people have heard of pregnancy cravings. It is normal for your preferences to change during pregnancy. But, if you find that you start craving things that aren’t food, you should see a doctor.

Constipation

The increase in progesterone in pregnancy slows down the movement of your bowel and can cause constipation. It usually doesn’t occur until later in pregnancy but if you already had trouble with constipation it might get worse early in pregnancy.

Blocked/runny nose

This can be a symptom of pregnancy. Sometimes using a humidifier or rinsing your nose with saline can be helpful. Pharmacies usually have kits for this available.

Different vaginal discharge

If you have read any of our other articles you probably know that vaginal discharge is very much influenced by our hormones. Discharge that is sticky or thicker than usual can be an early sign of pregnancy. “Normal” pregnancy discharge is usually white or clear in colour

NOTE: If your discharge is smelly, discoloured or you have pain/itching then this might be a sign of an infection. It is important to see a doctor so that you can be treated if you have an infection. Vaginal infections can cause complications in pregnancy if they are not treated.

Reflux/Heartburn

In the same way that progesterone slows down your bowel, it also relaxes the muscular ring that keeps your stomach contents in your stomach. You might find that you get reflux as your pregnancy progresses. Some women find that sleeping propped up on pillows helps this. If it is troubling you a lot, then see a doctor who can help. Please check with a healthcare professional before taking any antacids during pregnancy.

Nose bleeds

Nose bleeds can also become more common in pregnancy. The hormones affect the blood vessels all over your body but the ones in your nose are very close to the surface. They might bleed more easily because of the hormonal changes.

 

When do you need to see a doctor?

Unusual early pregnancy symptoms can be due to pregnancy, but can also occur because of other things. If any of the symptoms are causing you distress, then please see a healthcare professional for help. If you think you could be pregnant, then it is important to take a pregnancy test to confirm this and start planning your pregnancy.

IMPORTANT: There are some symptoms of pregnancy that can be associated with serious illnesses. There are also complications of pregnancy or miscarriage that can be severe.

If you are pregnant/think you might be pregnant and have any of the following symptoms please see a doctor urgently:

  • Pain in your lower belly (abdomen), with or without vaginal bleeding
  • Vaginal bleeding
    • NOTE: most women who have a small amount of bleeding in early pregnancy go on to have a normal pregnancy. However, it can be a sign of miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy
  • Difficulty breathing, with or without pain in your chest
  • Sudden pain or swelling in one of your calves
  • Vaginal bleeding with lightheadedness/dizziness

Remember that you know your body better than anyone else. If you are concerned then please seek medical attention.

 

Disclaimer: This website does not provide medical advice
The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. No material on this site is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Posted By  : Katherine Maslowski

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About the author

Katherine Maslowski

Katherine Maslowski

Katherine Maslowski Katherine is a junior doctor from New Zealand who has experience working in Obstetrics and Gynaecology and is currently studying an MSc in Women’s Health. She is passionate about women’s health and empowering women to learn about their bodies and understand how they work. She is particularly interested in sexual and reproductive health and helping women to make educated, informed choices about their health and wellbeing.

About the author

Katherine Maslowski

Katherine Maslowski

Katherine Maslowski Katherine is a junior doctor from New Zealand who has experience working in Obstetrics and Gynaecology and is currently studying an MSc in Women’s Health. She is passionate about women’s health and empowering women to learn about their bodies and understand how they work. She is particularly interested in sexual and reproductive health and helping women to make educated, informed choices about their health and wellbeing.

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